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People’s Platform on Water Shut Offs and Public Health

People’s Platform Action Regarding Residential Water Shut Offs

The People’s Platform delivered a letter to the Public Health Officer for the City of Detroit on Tuesday, July 2nd. The letter was followed by a phone call to her office. There has been no response from the health officer to date.

It is the position of the People’s Platform that the health officer has a duty to protect and advocate on behalf of the public’s health. Please watch for additional information about how you can participate in this action. You may distribute this letter across your network as well. The People’s Platform will continue to engage around this issue in solidarity with the many other groups including Michigan Welfare Rights Organization, Detroit People’s Water Board, and We the People.

Final-Letter-to-Pub-Hlth-Dirpg1 Final-Letter-to-Pub-Hlth-Dirpg2

Letter to Vernice Anthony, Director, Detroit Department of Health and Wellness Promotion


June 30, 2014

Vernice Anthony, Director
Detroit Department of Health and Wellness Promotion
1600 W Lafayette, Suite 200
Detroit, Michigan 48216

Dear Ms. Anthony,

The People’s Platform is a network of organizations including in its membership block clubs, community councils, neighborhood associations and a number of advocates and activist from across the seven city council districts in Detroit. The Peoples Platform is dedicated to working with residents to create healthy, vibrant, and sustainable neighborhoods across the city of Detroit by focusing on the following key issues: equitable land use policy; access to food and transportation; good jobs; and good governance. At our annual meeting on June 9th 2014, delegates to the Peoples Platform adopted a sixth issue area to include poverty and inequality with a focus on the water shutoffs occurring across the city of Detroit. We are particularly concerned about the impact of household water shutoffs on the most vulnerable of our community members the elderly and minor children.

This aggressive collection action could not come at a worse time for Detroiters in terms of what the economic picture looks like for many residents. Cuts to worker pensions, increased out of pocket cost for retiree health care and high rates of unemployment among the general population speaks to the overall financial insecurity that exist within households. Also, our research indicates that 44% of Detroit residents live at or below the federal poverty line in comparison to 20.7% of Michigan residents statewide. That number translates into nearly a quarter million African Americans. Further, according to census data roughly 10% of residents ages 55-64, live in extreme poverty and 50% overall live below the federal poverty level. When it comes to children the numbers are equally as compelling. Slightly more than half of Detroit children (50.6%) live at or below the federal poverty level compared to 22.1 % of children across the state. We believe that the data illustrates the financial hardships these households endure on a daily basis.

Recently the Detroit and Water Sewage Department (DWSD) launched the most aggressive shutoff and collection campaign in the history of the department. According to press accounts the department has pledged to shut off and disconnect from the city water supply an average of 1500 to 3000 households per week with an overall target of 30,000 households during the next several months. We believe that this policy of water shutoff as a collection strategy in addition to posing serious ethical issues, also has serious public health impacts. For example, shutoffs create unsanitary conditions leading to the transmission of dangerous bacteria contributing to increased UTIs; gastrointestinal problems; hepatitis A; influenza; and other diseases that are linked to unsafe water and poor sanitation. Household water shutoffs also exacerbate adverse mental health conditions in the home and is likely to bring about anxiety, anger, depression and other post-traumatic stress disorder like symptoms. Further, we are concerned that the notice of water shutoff which signals by public health code that the residence is unfit for human habitation, will also trigger a child welfare crisis potentially leading to the removal of children from the home under the orders of the child protective services.

We agree with the premise that the basis of public health is to protect and improve the health of the masses of the people. Dr. George Pickett, former Detroit Public Health Director, offered that public health should be used as a creative tool for the prevention of disease and the promotion of health. Therefore we call for the following considerations:

  As Public Health Officer for the City of Detroit, advise the mayor of the potential threat to public health in the face of the widespread water shutoffs;

  As Public Health Officer for the City of Detroit call for a moratorium on all water shutoffs;

  Recommend that as a matter of public policy a health impact assessment be conducted on the impact of water shutoffs on the population’s health with an analysis as to how these conditions further contribute to racial health inequities.

We applaud your long time commitment to public service and your contribution to the important policy discussions at the local, state and national level on improving the health of the community. It is with that expertise in mind that we call upon you to once again bring your voice and leadership into the forefront on behalf of those who stand in need. Please advise us if we can be of further assistance in this effort.

George D. Gaines, MPH, MSW
People’s Platform
Former Deputy Director Detroit Health Department

Linda S. Campbell, MPH
People’s Platform
Building Movement Project

Brother Jerry Smith
Executive Director
Capuchin Soup Kitchen of Detroit

Download and share the Letter

 

Action Alert – July 7, 2014 – Water Shut Offs and Public Health

Detroit People’s Platform Action Alert
July 7, 2014

District 4 Meeting July 15th

People’s Platform will host an update and organizing meeting in City Council District 4 on Tuesday, July 15th at Eastlake Baptist Church located at Conner and Jefferson. As part of the meeting The Community Land Trust Coalition will sponsor a bus tour of critical land sites in the Jefferson Chalmers and the role of community land trust in safeguarding these community assets. We will board the bus at 4:45 pm in the parking lot of East Lake Baptist Church. Bus seats are limited so please reserve your space no later than Saturday, July 12th by email to aaron8008@gmail.com

Following the bus tour at Eastlake Baptist Church, from 6:00 pm until 7:00 pm we will hold a Community Land Trust discussion, followed by the Peoples Platform update Refreshments will be served. If you live in District 4, please plan to attend this important meeting.

Community Benefits Agreement Ordinance Update

Here’s the latest on the Community Benefits Agreement. Equitable Detroit Coalition (EDC) has reached its goal of 1,000 petition signatures in support of the Community Benefit Agreement (CBA) ordinance currently before Detroit City Council.

Join us on Thursday, July 10th at 10:00 am at the Coleman A Young Municipal Center and show your support for the CBA ordinance.

People’s Platform Action Regarding Residential Water Shut Offs

The People’s Platform delivered a letter to the Public Health Officer for the City of Detroit on Tuesday, July 2nd. The letter was followed by a phone call to her office. There has been no response from the health officer to date.

It is the position of the People’s Platform that the health officer has a duty to protect and advocate on behalf of the public’s health. Please watch for additional information about how you can participate in this action. You may distribute this letter across your network as well. The People’s Platform will continue to engage around this issue in solidarity with the many other groups including Michigan Welfare Rights Organization, Detroit People’s Water Board, and We the People.

Final-Letter-to-Pub-Hlth-Dirpg1 Final-Letter-to-Pub-Hlth-Dirpg2

Letter to Vernice Anthony, Director, Detroit Department of Health and Wellness Promotion


June 30, 2014

Vernice Anthony, Director
Detroit Department of Health and Wellness Promotion
1600 W Lafayette, Suite 200
Detroit, Michigan 48216

Dear Ms. Anthony,

The People’s Platform is a network of organizations including in its membership block clubs, community councils, neighborhood associations and a number of advocates and activist from across the seven city council districts in Detroit. The Peoples Platform is dedicated to working with residents to create healthy, vibrant, and sustainable neighborhoods across the city of Detroit by focusing on the following key issues: equitable land use policy; access to food and transportation; good jobs; and good governance. At our annual meeting on June 9th 2014, delegates to the Peoples Platform adopted a sixth issue area to include poverty and inequality with a focus on the water shutoffs occurring across the city of Detroit. We are particularly concerned about the impact of household water shutoffs on the most vulnerable of our community members the elderly and minor children.

This aggressive collection action could not come at a worse time for Detroiters in terms of what the economic picture looks like for many residents. Cuts to worker pensions, increased out of pocket cost for retiree health care and high rates of unemployment among the general population speaks to the overall financial insecurity that exist within households. Also, our research indicates that 44% of Detroit residents live at or below the federal poverty line in comparison to 20.7% of Michigan residents statewide. That number translates into nearly a quarter million African Americans. Further, according to census data roughly 10% of residents ages 55-64, live in extreme poverty and 50% overall live below the federal poverty level. When it comes to children the numbers are equally as compelling. Slightly more than half of Detroit children (50.6%) live at or below the federal poverty level compared to 22.1 % of children across the state. We believe that the data illustrates the financial hardships these households endure on a daily basis.

Recently the Detroit and Water Sewage Department (DWSD) launched the most aggressive shutoff and collection campaign in the history of the department. According to press accounts the department has pledged to shut off and disconnect from the city water supply an average of 1500 to 3000 households per week with an overall target of 30,000 households during the next several months. We believe that this policy of water shutoff as a collection strategy in addition to posing serious ethical issues, also has serious public health impacts. For example, shutoffs create unsanitary conditions leading to the transmission of dangerous bacteria contributing to increased UTIs; gastrointestinal problems; hepatitis A; influenza; and other diseases that are linked to unsafe water and poor sanitation. Household water shutoffs also exacerbate adverse mental health conditions in the home and is likely to bring about anxiety, anger, depression and other post-traumatic stress disorder like symptoms. Further, we are concerned that the notice of water shutoff which signals by public health code that the residence is unfit for human habitation, will also trigger a child welfare crisis potentially leading to the removal of children from the home under the orders of the child protective services.

We agree with the premise that the basis of public health is to protect and improve the health of the masses of the people. Dr. George Pickett, former Detroit Public Health Director, offered that public health should be used as a creative tool for the prevention of disease and the promotion of health. Therefore we call for the following considerations:

  As Public Health Officer for the City of Detroit, advise the mayor of the potential threat to public health in the face of the widespread water shutoffs;

  As Public Health Officer for the City of Detroit call for a moratorium on all water shutoffs;

  Recommend that as a matter of public policy a health impact assessment be conducted on the impact of water shutoffs on the population’s health with an analysis as to how these conditions further contribute to racial health inequities.

We applaud your long time commitment to public service and your contribution to the important policy discussions at the local, state and national level on improving the health of the community. It is with that expertise in mind that we call upon you to once again bring your voice and leadership into the forefront on behalf of those who stand in need. Please advise us if we can be of further assistance in this effort.

George D. Gaines, MPH, MSW
People’s Platform
Former Deputy Director Detroit Health Department

Linda S. Campbell, MPH
People’s Platform
Building Movement Project

Brother Jerry Smith
Executive Director
Capuchin Soup Kitchen of Detroit

Action Alert! CBA Ordinance Review, Thurs May 22, 10am, CAYMC

CBAbuttonsAction Alert! The Community Benefit Agreement (CBA) ordinance will be reviewed in the Planning and Economic Development Committee tomorrow at 10 a.m. at the Coleman A. Young Municipal Center. Download a draft version of the CBA ordinance below.

Please plan to attend or to send someone from your constituency group.  It is important that we have a presence at this first committee hearing.

People’s Platform Members and our allies have contributed a lot of time and effort to getting the ordinance this far and want to make sure that our advocacy work continues to hold. Thank You!

CBA Ordinance Draft May 16, 2014 (970.2 KiB, 86 downloads)

World Renowned Water Activist, Maude Barlow, to Speak on Regional Water Issues in Detroit

Detroit, Mich. – On Thursday, May 22 at 6:30 p.m. the People’s Water Board Coalition will partner with Wayne State University’s Office of Sustainability to host a special discussion on regional water issues with Maude Barlow.

Barlow is the national chairperson of the Council of Canadians and chairs the board of the national consumer advocacy organization Food & Water Watch. Barlow is the recipient of eleven honorary doctorates as well as many awards, including the 2005 Right Livelihood Award (known as the “Alternative Nobel”), the Citation of Lifetime Achievement at the 2008 Canadian Environment Awards and the 2009 Earth Day Canada Outstanding Environmental Achievement Award. She is also the best-selling author or co-author of 17 books.

The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department (DWSD) recently announced its plan to shut-off water at thousands of Detroit residences. At the same time Detroit’s Emergency Financial Manager, Kevyn Orr, has announced his intention to privatize DWSD, the drinking water provider for roughly four-million people in southeast Michigan. This event will highlight the benefits of protecting our water systems from private interests, and why public control is the key to ensuring safe, clean, affordable water for all.

Barlow will be available after the event to sign copies of her new book Blue Future.

This event is free and open to the public.

Who:
People’s Water Board Coalition

Speakers:
Maude Barlow, Council of Canadians;
Jim Olson, Founder, President and Advisor of FLOW (For Love of Water);
others to be announced.

When:
Thursday, May 22, 2014
Doors at 6:00 p.m.
Program 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Where:
Marvin I. Danto Engineering Development Center
5050 Anthony Wayne Drive
Engineering Development Center (EDC)
Auditorium, Room 1507, Detroit, MI  48202

Parking:           Parking Structure 2 - 5150 Lodge Service Drive, Detroit, MI 48202

The cost is $6.50. There is also metered 2-hour parking located on the street. The cost for 2 hours is $2 at a meter.

The People’s Water Board includes: AFSCME Local 207, Detroit Black Community Food Security Network, Detroit Green Party, East Michigan Environmental Action Council, Food & Water Watch, FLOW, Great Lakes Bioneers Detroit, Matrix Theater, Michigan Emergency Committee Against War & Injustice, Michigan Welfare Rights Organization, Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute, Sierra Club and Voices for Earth Justice

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Food & Water Watch works to ensure the food, water, and fish we consume is safe, accessible and sustainable. So we can all enjoy and trust in what we eat and drink, we help people take charge of where their food comes from, keep clean, affordable, public tap water flowing freely to our homes, protect the environmental quality of our oceans, force government to do its job protecting citizens, and educate about the importance of keeping shared resources under public control. www.foodandwaterwatch.org

BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION TRADES APPRENTICESHIP READINESS TRAINING

Detroit Access For All Flyer (3)

ACCESS for ALL
BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION TRADES APPRENTICESHIP READINESS TRAINING
Now Enrolling for Classes

Starting May 2014
Contact an Access for All Representative Today!
(313) 945-5200 Ext. 4317

“START YOUR CAREER IN THE BUILDING TRADES NOW”
Classroom/Worksite Training – 294 HOURS Minimum Program Requirements

■ Unemployed or Underemployed
■ Detroit Resident
■ High School Diploma or GED
■ 18 Years Old or Older
■ Valid Michigan Drivers License
■ Ability to Pass Drug Screen
■ Subject to a Criminal Background Check
■ Experience in the Building Trades a plus
■ Minimum 10th grade Reading & Math required (determined by assessment)

UPON SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF ACCESS FOR ALL TRAINING, POTENTIAL UNION APPRENTICESHIP OPPORTUNITIES INCLUDE:

■ Electrician
■ Carpenter
■ Operating Engineer
■ Laborer
■ Cement Mason
■ Ironworker

“This project was privately funded by a grant from the Detroit Regional Workforce Fund. The DRWF is operated by United Way for Southeastern Michigan and includes public and private investors: the Knight Foundation, the Kresge Foundation, Jobs for the Future and the U.S. Department of Labor, United Way for Southeastern Michigan, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the Skillman Foundation, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation, the Detroit Economic Growth Corporation, JP Morgan Chase Global Philanthropy, and the Michigan Office of Urban and Metropolitan Initiatives.”

Advisory Update & Action Alert

Detroit People’s Platform Advisory Update & Action Alert
April 16, 2014

Please see the food justice and governance updates and information below. Note that some are time sensitive.

coop
Detroit Black Community Food Security Network
This is short notice, but tonight, April 16th at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History from 6:30-8:00pm DBCFSN is hosting a film screening highlighting Historic Virginia Park Cooperative and a discussion about Detroit’s legacy of cooperatives. They will also share information about the forthcoming grocery store co-op in the North End. Refreshments will be served.

Additionally, the Ujamaa Buying Club is accepting orders. The club allows for members to save money money on healthy food items and other products. You can join their four-week cycle buying club. It is currently free to join! Visit the website and email them if you’d like to join.

Orders for this month are DUE THURSDAY, April 17, 2014.
Order pick-up will be the following Thursday at DBCFSN offices at 3800 Puritan in Detroit. The Ujamaa Ordering tutorial can be found here!

demsum

The Affects of the Emergency Manager in our Community!
There will be a Panel Discussions & Public Testimonial to discuss
Voting Rights & Other Legal Implications, education, unions/jobs, and community. This will take place on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 at the Michigan AFSCME Council 25 Building
600 West Lafayette Blvd. (Corner of Third Street) from 4 – 10 p.m. in the Auditorium.

CAC (Community Advisory Council) Update
As some of you may already know, the CAC Ordinance has been passed and should be published in the legal news by Thursday, April 16th. After that it is up to local groups within the districts to collect signatures. The number of signatures have to amount to 10% of the number of voters in the last election.

After the petitions are signed Detroit City Council has to pass another ordinance, and then a second group of signatures must be gathered for candidates.  July 22nd is the deadline for the November election.  There are a number of timing issues involved in getting this done before 2016.  Including City Council’s summer recess at some point when they may have to act on the initial petitions to create the districts.

Next steps would be to determine the interest in doing this at this time as well as the strategy. Additionally, if the Emergency Manager refuses to approve it and/or if it doesn’t get published this week in the legal news, a decision will have to be made as to the next steps. We will work to keep everyone updated.

Department of Neighborhoods District Team
As as FYI, the following information is from the City of Detroit Department of Neighborhoods. Below is the list of the  Department of Neighborhoods District team. They have been charged with the task of eliminating blight in their district. They will do this by working closely with neighborhood and other community organizations, CDCs, faith based organizations and local businesses to identify and prioritize concerns, and then coordinate with the appropriate city department to deliver results. They are to help residents address all blight related issues, including dangerous building demolition, repurposing vacant lots and structurally sound vacant buildings, as well as non-structural blight. The image below contains contact information and the same may also be found by clicking here.

districtmanagers

Rev. Ross: Let Detroiters rebuild the city

RevRoss564x198

March 3, 2014 at 1:00 am

Rev. Ross: Let Detroiters rebuild the city

LANDThe Detroit City Council recently granted Olympia Development of Michigan almost $3 million worth of public land and hundreds of millions of public dollars to erect a hockey arena and pursue other developments in Detroit’s Cass Corridor. The argument behind putting public money and resources into private sports complexes and the like is that municipalities will recoup the money from tax revenue and revitalization. But careful study of these deals reveals otherwise.

Research from 1984 by Forest College economist Robert Baade right up to 2012 by the investment bank UBS (Batter Up: Public Sector Support for Professional Sports Facilities) shows that cities generally don’t benefit from such deals. To quote the UBS study: “Unfortunately, independent academic research studies consistently conclude that new stadiums and arenas have no measurable effect on the level of real income or employment in the metropolitan areas in which they are located.”

In spite of UBS’s findings, there is one way such deals can benefit someone other than the developer. The only times taxpayers see tangible benefits from bankrolling billionaire sports franchise owners is when the community demands and gets community benefit agreements, which are contracts signed by developers. The Staples Center in Los Angeles and the CONSOL Energy Center in Pittsburgh are examples of such projects benefiting the cities involved through community benefit agreements. Both cities were in better financial shape than Detroit is today, and both still found it necessary to protect themselves financially.

Even though the City Council accepted Olympia’s handshake and promise to do right by Detroiters this time, there is an ordinance before the council that would guarantee community benefit agreements for such projects in the future. Just as Olympia would never sublet work to another firm without a contract, it is only fair that the city have an equally enforceable agreement for hundreds of millions of public dollars.

If Detroiters don’t value the city’s assets and integrity, developers never will. Indeed, the bankruptcy has created a fire sale mentality where everything is supposed to be had on the cheap. City Council must take steps make sure the city gets a fair deal with developers:

■ Developers sign legal contracts to abide by the terms of the community benefit agreement.

■ Community oversight boards to ensure transparency.

■ Developers hold public hearings on projects with adequate notice.

■ Rent control and other protections for residents in the case of rising property values.

■ Projects should train and employ city residents.

These are some of the broad outlines of how the city must conduct business to keep residents from getting the short end of the stick.

In a just world, billionaires would fund their own projects. It is particularly unjust that corporations come to an entity as short on resources as the city of Detroit and demand resources to fund privately owned development.

The least City Council can do is pass an ordinance to protect the city and its residents by leveling the playing field for Detroiters.

The Rev. Joan C. Ross is director of the North End Woodward Community Coalition and executive director of the Greater Woodward Community Development Corp.

From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20140303/OPINION01/303030001#ixzz2uu7J9xLv

Action Alert: City Council Evening Meeting Monday March 3rd

City Council discussion of ordinance to establish Community Advisory Councils

Monday March 3rd 3pm
Coleman A. Young Municipal Center,
13th Floor – 2 Woodward Ave, Detroit

If you want to see a Community Advisory Council (CAC) established in your district, please attend this City Council meeting and voice your opinion by giving public comment at this session.
View the Current draft version of the CAC ordinance here. https://docs.google.com/file/d/0BzH9McDOCGeveV9JMDIzQV90ZG8/edit

TAKE ACTION – Tell the City Council to pass the enabling CAC ordinance as quickly as possible to allow the timely establishment of CACs.

Additionally let council members know that the ordinance should include the following:

Establish a filing deadline that allows potential candidates to run directly in the November 2014 general election.
Allow the concurrent collection of petition signatures to establish each CAC and the filing petitions for CAC candidates to run in the election.
Enable CACs to receive basic administrative support from the City in order that they can comply with Open Meetings and Freedom of Information Requirements.
City Council should establish the procedure whereby the Youth and Senior Representatives (2 seats) on the CAC are appointed by the 5 elected CAC members using an open and transparent nomination process.

If you cannot be at City Council on Monday, you may also submit your comments by email to City Council members directly (contact info is below) or send them to Aaron Goodman aarongoodman@cdad-online.org (CDAD staff) by noon on March 3rd and we will forward those on to the City Council.

More information on CACs:
When the new Detroit City Charter was approved in 2011, one of the most anticipated changes was the creation of city council districts and having seven city council members elected to represent those districts. With the election of a new district-based City Council in 2013, Detroiters now have raised expectations of greater accountability and responsiveness from their elected officials and city government.

There is a lesser known provision in the charter that will play a critical role in fulfilling our expectations of the new council and further raise the bar for resident engagement with local policy issues and elected officials. This is the establishment of Community Advisory Councils (CACs), which are elected citizen boards in each of the seven council districts. CACs will be an important tool to promote meaningful community engagement in city government decision-making and encourage communication and accountability between residents and their City Council member.

Each CAC will consist of five residents elected from their district and one youth resident (age 13 -17) and one resident “selected as representing senior issues,” for a total of seven members of the CAC for each district. The youth and senior positions will be selected in a process yet to be determined by City Council. CAC members will serve four years terms, except for the youth member who will serve for one year.

CACs are mandated by the City Charter, yet there is more work to be done by both Detroit residents and the City Council to bring this important tool into existence. City Council is currently considering an ordinance that is required to establish CACs in each district.

Once the ordinance is adopted, each district that wants a CAC must submit petitions signed by 10% of the number of voters in the last election, and interested candidates must file to run in the next election. If a CAC is not established in your district in time for candidates to run in the 2014 general election, the next opportunity to elect a CAC will not be until November 2016.

2014CouncilContactSM

 

2014 DETROIT CITY COUNCIL CONTACT INFO
Brenda Jones, Council President, At Large
313.224.1245 – bjones_mb@detroitmi.gov
Saunteel Jenkins, At Large
313.224.4248 – councilmemberjenkins@detroitmi.gov
James Tate, District 1
313.224.1027 – councilmembertate@detroitmi.gov
George Cushingberry, Jr., District 2
313.224.4535 – cushingberryg@detroitmi.gov
Scott Benson, District 3
313.224.1198 – bensons@detroitmi.gov
Andre Spivey, District 4
313.224.4841 – CouncilmanSpivey@detroitmi.gov
Mary Sheffield, District 5
313.224.4505 – sheffieldm@detroitmi.gov
Raquel Castaneda-Lopez, District 6
313.224.2450 – castaneda-lopezr@detroitmi.gov
Gabe Leland, District 7
313.224.2151 – lelandg@detroitmi.gov
LEARN MORE, DOWNLOAD, PRINT & SHARE RESOURCES from UNITINGDETROITERS.ORG

VIDEO: WSU professor Peter Hammer on Detroit Future City plan

from: http://www.mlive.com/news/detroit/index.ssf/2014/02/wayne_state_professor_calls_de.html

DETROIT, MI — A Wayne State University professor sees Detroit’s long-term urban planning blueprint as destructive and plans a Feb. 25 presentation to explain why he views it as a “deathblow” to the the city.

The 347-page Detroit Future City strategic framework was revealed in 2013 after years of planning spurred by former Mayor Dave Bing. And new Mayor Mike Duggan’s development chief has called the document his “Bible.”

The plan’s implementation office is scheduled to open a new location in a Feb. 20 announcement of top priorities and a new branding plan.

But law professor Peter Hammer a few days later plans to present his case against the framework, which he said will “re-organize Detroit out of existence.”

Hammer is director of the Damon Keith Center for Civil Rights at Wayne State University Law School.

 

Thanks to Shane Bernardo for the live stream!

MLIVE.com announcing the event:
http://www.mlive.com/news/detroit/index.ssf/2014/02/wayne_state_professor_calls_de.html

Read and download the “Framework”
http://detroitfuturecity.com/framework/